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The piping-hot U.S. job market may be cooling off, if only slightly. But what business managers, policymakers, investors and economists want to know is this: How cool would be cool enough for the inflation fighters at the Federal Reserve to begin to ease their aggressive interest rate hikes? The government’s jobs report for September, coming Friday morning, is expected to show that employers added 250,000 jobs last month. That would be the lowest monthly gain since December 2020 and would mark a drop from an average of 438,000 from January through August. Yet by any historical standard, it would still amount to a healthy total.

Asian shares have followed Wall Street lower ahead of U.S. jobs data that investors hope will persuade the Federal Reserve to ease off plans for more interest rate hikes. Tokyo and Hong Kong, the region’s biggest markets, retreated. Chinese markets were closed for a holiday. Oil prices were little-changed. Wall Street fell after a private sector report showed U.S. employers hired slightly more workers than forecast in September. That gives ammunition to Fed officials who say more rate hikes are needed to cool the economy and rein in inflation that is at a four-decade high. The U.S. government was due to release its official data on September hiring.

In a close diplomatic victory for China, the U.N.’s top human rights body has voted down a proposal from Britain, Turkey, the United States and other mostly Western countries to hold a debate on alleged rights abuses against Muslim Uyghurs and other ethnic minorities in China’s western Xinjiang region. At the 47-member state Human Rights Council, 17 countries voted in favor, 19 were against, and 11 abstained in a vote to hold a debate on Xinjiang at its next session in March. The vote amounted to a test of political and diplomatic clout between the West and Beijing. In August, former U.N. human rights chief Michelle Bachelet’s office had released a report that found that possible “crimes against humanity” had occurred in Xinjiang.

The nuclear-powered U.S. aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan has begun a new round of naval drills with South Korean warships. The two-day training that began Friday came a day after North Korea fired two ballistic missiles toward the sea and flew 12 warplanes near the border in an escalation of its weapons tests. The Reagan and its battle group returned to the waters near the Korean Peninsula after North Korea earlier this week launched a nuclear-capable missile over Japan in response to the carrier group’s earlier training with South Korean navy ships. North Korea views U.S.-South Korean military exercises as an invasion rehearsal. South Korea's military says the latest drills occur off the peninsula's east coast.

    President Joe Biden says the risk of nuclear “Armageddon” is at the highest level since the 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis, as Russian officials speak of the possibility of using tactical nuclear weapons after suffering massive setbacks in the eight-month invasion of Ukraine. Speaking at a fundraiser Thursday for the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee, Biden said Russian President Vladimir Putin was “not joking when he talks about the use of tactical nuclear weapons or biological or chemical weapons.” Biden added, “We have not faced the prospect of Armageddon since Kennedy and the Cuban Missile Crisis.”

    Volunteers for ‘Operation Eagles Wings’ are using surveys in eight states to seek support for conspiracy theories.

    Trump allies have interviewed nearly 200 election officials, including some in Wisconsin, to probe for weaknesses is a post from WisconsinWatch.org, a non-profit investigative news site covering Wisconsin since 2009. Please consider making a contribution to support our journalism.

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    Volunteers for ‘Operation Eagles Wings’ are using surveys in eight states to seek support for conspiracy theories.

    Trump allies have interviewed nearly 200 election officials, including some in Wisconsin, to probe for weaknesses is a post from WisconsinWatch.org, a non-profit investigative news site covering Wisconsin since 2009. Please consider making a contribution to support our journalism.