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    A strong earthquake has shaken parts of Indonesia’s main island of Java, causing panic but only minor damage just two weeks after an equally powerful quake killed hundreds. The head of the national rescue agency says the quake on Saturday injured one resident in West Java’s Garut district, and at least four houses and a school were damaged. No other casualties have been reported. A magnitude 5.6 earthquake on Nov. 21 killed at least 331 people and injured nearly 600 in West Java’s Cianjur city. The U.S. Geological Survey says the latest quake measured 5.7 magnitude. High-rises in Jakarta, the capital, swayed for more than 10 seconds and some ordered evacuations, sending streams of people into the streets.

      Many people on the Big Island of Hawaii are bracing for major upheaval if lava from Mauna Loa volcano blocks the quickest route connecting two sides of the island. The molten rock could make the road impassable and force drivers to find alternate coastal routes in the north and south. That could add hours to commute times, doctor’s visits and freight truck deliveries. The lava is oozing slowly at a rate that could reach the road next week. But its path is unpredictable and could change course, or the flow could stop completely and spare the highway.

        A tiny Nevada toad at the center of a legal battle over a geothermal project has officially been declared an endangered species. U.S. wildlife officials had temporarily listed it on a rarely used emergency basis last spring. The Fish and Wildlife Service said in a formal rule published Friday that the Dixie Valley toad is at risk of extinction "primarily due to the approval and commencement of geothermal development” about 100 miles east of Reno. Other threats to the quarter-sized amphibian include groundwater pumping, agriculture, climate change, disease and predation from bullfrogs. The temporary listing in April marked only the second time in 20 years the agency had taken such emergency action.

          A former coal-fired power plant in New Jersey was imploded Friday, and its owners announced plans for a new $1 billion venture on the site, where batteries will be deployed to store power from clean energy sources including wind and solar. The move came as New Jersey and other states move aggressively to adopt clean energy to combat climate change. Starwood Energy demolished the former Logan Generating Plant in Logan Township. That site, and a second power plant site in Carneys Point, will host large facilities where batteries will be arrayed to store clean energy and release it to the power grid as needed.

            The spectacle of incandescent lava spewing from Hawaii's Mauna Loa has drawn thousands of visitors and is turning into a tourism boon for a Big Island town near the world’s largest volcano. Some hotels in and around Hilo are becoming fully booked in what is normally a slower time of the year for business. Helicopter tours of Mauna Loa, which began erupting Sunday after being quiet for 38 years, are also in high demand by tourists and journalists. Hawaii's travel industry normally falls off this time of year between the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays.

              Mexico's economy secretary has proposed yet another round of talks with the United States on a dispute over Mexico's energy sector.  Mexico hopes to stave off a full-fledged trade complaint under the U.S.-Mexico-Canada trade agreement. The United States says Mexico is unfairly favoring its state-owned electricity and oil companies over American competitors and clean-energy suppliers. U.S. Trade Representative Katherine Tai appears willing to keep talking, but her office says she  “underscored the urgency of prompt and meaningful progress" at a Thursday meeting. The two countries also appear headed for another commercial dispute over a Mexican ban on imports of genetically modified yellow corn.

              By all measures Wisconsin’s economy continues to be strong - adding jobs and sustaining an unemployment rate below the national average. But a lingering concern in many communities is a lack of workforce housing. Higher construction costs, stagnant housing development and limited affordable …

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              WITH VIDEO: The man being prosecuted for using personal information of Wisconsin politicians to order their absentee ballots will be allowed to utilize the expertise of former Wisconsin Supreme Court Justice Michael Gableman, despite the prior history between Gableman and one of those identified as a victim in the case: Assembly Speaker Robin Vos.

              By all measures Wisconsin’s economy continues to be strong - adding jobs and sustaining an unemployment rate below the national average. But a lingering concern in many communities is a lack of workforce housing. Higher construction costs, stagnant housing development and limited affordable …