Skip to main contentSkip to main content

    The unabashedly liberal city of San Francisco became the unlikely proponent of weaponized police robots last week after supervisors approved them for limited use. In doing so, the board addressed head-on an evolving technology that's become more widely available, although rarely deployed to confront suspects. San Francisco Police Chief Bill Scott said armed robots would be used only as a last resort. Three members of the city's Board of Supervisors joined dozens of protesters against the policy outside City Hall on Monday. Police departments across the U.S. are facing increasing scrutiny of militarized equipment, amid a yearslong national reckoning on criminal justice.

      This week’s new entertainment releases include Will Smith’s comeback campaign in the Antoine Fuqua movie “Emancipation,” a documentary about Broadway star Idina Menzel, the video game “Dragon Quest Treasures” and a TV series exploring the tumultuous relationship between country music stars Tammy Wynette and George Jones. Director Guillermo del Toro finally gets to release his version of "Pinocchio” and there's a holiday-themed romantic comedy at Amazon Prime about a jewelry mix-up that leads to sparks in “Something from Tiffany’s.” Can’t get to New York but still want to hear chart-toppers? Join the iHeartRadio Jingle Ball Tour at Madison Square Garden with Dua Lipa, Lizzo, and Charlie Puth,

        The United States and European Union have agreed to intensify talks to resolve EU concerns over major subsidies for American companies contained in a U.S. clean energy law. Although no deal was reached at talks Monday, the two sides pledged to continue work and push for a solution that benefits both U.S. and European firms, workers and consumers. The U.S. Inflation Reduction Act offers about $375 billion in new and extended tax credits to help the the U.S. clean energy industry as well as buyers of qualifying electric vehicles made in North America. But European leaders have expressed alarm that the subsidies would be an enormous setback for European companies.

          “Tracers In The Dark" by Andy Greenberg sketches the evolution of a wholly new discipline — the tracking of cryptocurrency transactions by a new breed of digital sleuths. They take down Silk Road and other “dark web” markets and merchants, finger crypto money launderers and snare the sysadmin and users  a major distributor of child sexual abuse material. Associated Press Technology Writer Frank Bajak calls the book a surprisingly lively real-life police procedural whose author, a writer for Wired, deftly teases out technical detail without slowing the narrative. There are takedown dramas and well told is how Dutch cyber police surreptitiously take over and run the Hansa dark web marketplace.

            As Elon Musk is finding out, running a global social media platform requires more than a few good algorithms. It also presents tough decisions about what kind of content to allow, and how to handle users who break the rules. Since Musk purchased Twitter, however, the rules have become unclear and enforcement inconsistent. The platform announced it was ending its COVID-19 misinformation policy, only to say no policies had changed. Ye, the rapper formerly known as Kanye West, was banished from Twitter for posting antisemitic content, even as the platform reinstated the account belonging to a neo-Nazi leader. Social media experts say the lack of clear and enforceable content rules could hurt Twitter if users start to lose trust.

              Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee is considering introducing express toll lanes on highways and tripling a fee for electric car owners as he looks for ways to pay for tens of billions of dollars in roadway projects. The Republican is just as adamant about what he won’t do. He doesn't want to raise gas taxes, add fully tolled roads, or issue debt to fund roads. With Tennessee’s rapid growth and truck traffic, state transportation officials say $26 billion in projects are needed to address worsening congestion. Lawmakers would need to sign off on letting private companies build the express toll lanes. They also would need to approve increasing the electric vehicle fee from $100 to $300.

              Science reveals 3 key factors to an energized, alert day. What you eat, when you wake up and how active you are all matter, new research shows. Read more

              The deadline for obtaining the Real ID needed to board a domestic flight has been pushed back again, with the Department of Homeland Security citing the lingering impact of the COVID-19 pandemic for the slower-than-expected rollout. The deadline to have a Real ID had been May 3, 2023, but DHS announced Monday that it was pushed back to May 7, 2025. People are getting compliant IDs as they renew driver’s licenses, but DHS said the pandemic resulted in backlogs at state driver’s license offices. Because of the backlogs, many state agencies that issue driver’s licenses automatically extended expiration dates on licenses and ID cards, rather than issuing compliant licenses and cards.

              Affiliate

              With the holiday season in full swing, you may be planning to travel a long distance to spend the holidays with family and friends. When it comes to taking your pet along, you may wonder if flying is the best option.  Flying is definitely a quick and seemingly simple way to get you and your pet to where you’re going.  Instead of spending hours driving, you and your furry sidekick will spend a lot less actual travel time when you are on a plane.  However, like all travel methods, flying does pose some potential obstacles and risks to take into consideration.